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Friday, February 29, 2008

some good advice

'Stay away from credit cards and invest in yourself and remember: A. Money doesn't create man, but it is the man who created money.
B. Live your life as simple as you are.
C. Don't do what others say. Just listen to them, but do what makes you feel good.
D. Don't go on brand name. Wear those things in which you feel comfortable.

E. Don't waste your money on unnecessary things. Spend on those who really are in need.
F. After all, it's your life. Why give others the chance to rule your life?'

Thursday, February 28, 2008

Homeopathy Remedies, Treatment

Angina - Treatment & Homeopathic Medicines
 
 

Wednesday, February 27, 2008

rain water harvesting with roof washer

 

Rainwater Harvesting and Purification System

 
 
 
 

Design of recharge structures and settlement tank water harvesting

The rate of recharge in comparison to runoff is a critical factor. However, since accurate recharge rates are not available without detailed geo-hydrological studies, the rates have to be assumed. The capacity of recharge tank is designed to retain runoff from at least 15 minutes rainfall of peak intensity. (For Delhi, peak hourly rainfall is 90 mm (based on 25 year frequency) and 15 minutes peak rainfall is 22.5 mm/hr, say, 25 mm, according to CGWB norms).
Illustration
For an area of 100 sq. m.,
volume of desilting tank required in Delhi = 100 x 0.025 x 0.85
                                                            = 2.125 cu. m. (2,125 litres)

Design of a recharge trench

The methodology of design of a recharge trench is similar to that for a settlement tank. The difference is that the water-holding capacity of a recharge trench is less than its gross volume because it is filled with porous material. A factor of loose density of the media (void ratio) has to be applied to the equation. The void ratio of the filler material varies with the kind of material used, but for commonly used materials like brickbats, pebbles and gravel, a void ratio of 0.5 may be assumed.
Using the same method as used for designing a settlement tank:
Assuming a void ratio of 0.5, the required capacity of a recharge tank
        = (100 x 0.025 x 0.85)/0.5
        = 4.25 cu. m. (4,250 litres)

In designing a recharge trench, the length of the trench is an important factor. Once the required capacity is calculated, length can be calculated by considering a fixed depth and width.

http://www.rainwaterharvesting.org/Urban/Design_Recharge.htm

Rain water harvesting Design of storage tanks

Design of storage tanks
The volume of the storage tank can be determined by the following factors:
  • Number of persons in the household: The greater the number of persons, the greater the storage capacity required to achieve the same efficiency of fewer people under the same roof area.
  • Per capita water requirement: This varies from household to household based on habits and also from season to season. Consumption rate has an impact on the storage systems design as well as the duration to which stored rainwater can last.
  • Average annual rainfall
  • Period of water scarcity: Apart from the total rainfall, the pattern of rainfall -whether evenly distributed through the year or concentrated in certain periods will determine the storage requirement. The more distributed the pattern, the lesser the size.
  • Type and size of the catchment:Type of roofing material determines the selection of the runoff coefficient for designs. Size could be assessed by measuring the area covered by the catchment i.e., the length and horizontal width. Larger the catchment, larger the size of the required cistern (tank).
Dry season demand versus supply approach
In this approach there are three options for determining the volume of storage:
  1. Matching the capacity of the tank to the area of the roof
  2. Matching the capacity of the tank to the quantity of water required by its users
  3. Choosing a tank size that is appropriate in terms of costs, resources and construction methods.

In practice the costs, resources and the construction methods tend to limit the tanks to smaller capacities than would otherwise be justified by roof areas or likely needs of consumers. For this reason elaborate calculations aimed at matching tank capacity to roof area is usually unnecessary. However a simplified calculation based on the following factors can give a rough idea of the potential for rainwater colection.

Illustration
Suppose the system has to be designed for meeting drinking water requirement of a five-member family living in a building with a rooftop area of 100 sq. m. The average annual rainfall in the region is 600 mm (average annual rainfall in Delhi is 611 mm). Daily drinking water requirement per person (drinking and cooking) is 10 litres.

Design procedure:

Following details are available:
Area of the catchment (A) = 100 sq. m.
Average annual rainfall (R) = 611 mm (0.61 m)
Runoff coefficient (C) = 0.85 1. Calculate the maximum amount of rainfall that can be harvested from the rooftop:
Annual water harvesting potential = 100 x 0.6 x 0.85
                                                 = 51 cu. m. (51,000 litres)
2. Determine the tank capacity: This is based on the dry period, i.e., the period between the two consecutive rainy seasons. For example, with a monsoon extending over four months, the dry season is of 245 days.
3. Calculate drinking water requirement for the family for the dry season
        = 245 x 5 x 10
        = 12,250 litres

As a safety factor, the tank should be built 20 per cent larger than required, i.e., 14,700 litres. This tank can meet the basic drinking water requirement of a 5-member family for the dry period. A typical size of a rectangular tank constructed in the basement will be about 4.0 m x 4.0 m x 1.0 m


Salient features of this approach:

  1. Simplest approach to system design but is relevant only in areas where distinct dry seasons exist
  2. Provides a rough estimate of storage volume requirements
  3. This method does not take into account variations between different years, such as the occurrence of drought years. It also entirely ignores rainfall input and the capacity of the catchment to deliver the runoff necessary to fill the storage tank.
  4. This technique can be used in the absence of any rainfall data and is easily understandable to the layperson.These points are especially relevant when designing systems in the remote areas of developing countries where obtaining reliable rainfall data can be difficult.
 
 

cost rain water harvesting 1000 sq mtr

 

PROPOSAL FOR RECHARGE PIT :

Total Area Contributing to Run Off : 10,000 sq feet= 1000 Sq Mtr

For design consideration, rainfall intensity of 25 mm has to be taken into account

Considering four recharge pits,

Recharge Pit Size : 2 x 2 x 2.25 Mtr ; Filter material Depth = 0.9 mtr

Depth to water level in summer (Pre Monsoon)= 25 mtr bgl , Hence bore well depth should be atleast 25 mtr bgl

COST ESTIMATE OF WELL :

PIT SIZE : 2 x 2 x 2.25 mtr, 4 nos , Filter material Depth =0.9 mtr

 

Sr No

Work

Qty

Unit

Rate

Amount (Rs)

1

Excavation

9

cum

300/=

2700

2

PCC,0.10m thick at footing

0.2

cum

2700/=

540

3

B/W, 0.23 m thick

4.14

cum

2400/=

9936

4

Plaster(Inside)

18

Sq m

85/=

1530

5

Coarse sand ,2 mm size,0.3 mtr depth, as filter material in injection well

1.2

cum

1000/=

1200

6

Gravel, 5 mm size ,0.3 mtr depth, as filter material in injection well

1.2

cum

1000/=

1200

7

Boulder, 5 mm size, 0.3 mtr depth, as filter material in injection well

1.2

cum

1000/=

1200

8

Pea Gravel ,5 mm size ,between inwell bore and casing , volume=0.03 sq mtr x depth in mtr

0.75

cum

1200/=

900

9

RCC Cover over injection well pit,0.10 m thick

0.4

cum

4000/=

1600

10

Removal of debris

9

cum

200/=

1800

11

Inwell bore, 10 inch dia

25

mtr

800/=

20,000

12

Casing, 6 Inches, MS, Blind

15

mtr

650/=

9750

13

Casing, 6 Inches, MS, Slots

10

mtr

750/=

7500

14

MS pipe interconnecting to injection well pit, 4 inch dia

mtr

400/=

NA

15

MS pipe laying and fittings

mtr

300/=

NA

16

Development charges

LS

7,500/=

17

Pipe Lowering

LS

5000/=

18

Demolision by jack hammering for breaking the RCC floor for laying MS interconnecting pipes

Hourly

400/=

NA

19

Dwarf Wall, B/W, 0.23 mtr thick,0.5 mtr depth

cum

1550/=

NA

20

TOTAL

72356

21

PROFIT

%

20

14471

22

Overhead

%

10

7235

23

TOTAL

94062

24

ROUND OFF

95,000/=

25

NUMBERS

4

26

QUOTATION

3,80,000/=

Comments:

Excludes:

  1. MS pipe interconnecting to injection well pit, 4 inch dia
  2. All Junction Box ,civil work
  3. All Taxes

 

Payment terms

50% as advance along with work order

40% during progress of work

10 % on completion of work

Project Duration : One Month

BRAIN TEST

You have a balanced brain — able to draw on the strengths of both the right and left hemispheres depending on context. Typically, people with balanced right and left hemispheres are very comfortable with switching between local and global perspectives — that is, paying attention to both small details and larger issues when the circumstance indicates. That means they can identify elements that make up an image or situation and also attend to the larger, more holistic pattern or unified whole that those details comprise.

You are able to capitalize on the left hemisphere's skills in verbal communication as well on the right hemisphere's focus on patterns and association making. This rare combination makes you a very creative and flexible thinker.

Depending on the situation, you may rely on one hemisphere or the other. Some situations may lend themselves to using your right brain's creativity and flexibility while other situations may call for a more structured approach as dictated by your left brain.

That's how your brain processes information. And while your dominant brain hemisphere certainly contributes to the way you process information, there is also a style of learning, unrelated to your dominant hemisphere, that determines the ways in which you are best able to pick up information. When you're learning something new, your dominant brain hemisphere will want to take over. But there are times when the information being presented is not well suited to your dominant hemisphere's abilities.

That's why, in addition to your hemispheric dominance, you also have a style of learning that is dominant for you. Whether you know it or not, you are naturally predisposed to learning things visually, aurally, or through a combination of the two.

Your test results show that you are a visual learner.

Other balanced-brained people who are visual learners are scientist and theoretician Buckminster Fuller, painter Pablo Picasso, news anchor Tom Brokaw, and scientist Stephen Hawking. But before delving deeper into how you learn, you should get the basics of your brain's physiology.
http://web.tickle.com/tests/brain/paidresult.jsp?

Sunday, February 24, 2008

Environmental Impacts from Meat and Fish Processing

Meat Processing: Environmental Impacts

Environmental Impacts from Meat and Fish Processing

Meat and fish processors must operate in a manner that protects human health and the environment while maintaining the highest food safety standards. If not minimized and properly managed, these operations can create enormous negative impacts on the environment. The primary environmental issues associated with meat and fish processing are water use, high-strength effluent discharge, and energy consumption. The meat and poultry processing industry (excluding rendering) uses an estimated 150 billion gallons of water annually. Although a portion of the water used by the industry is reused or recycled, most of the water becomes wastewater. Noise, odor and solid wastes are additional significant impacts that can detrimentally affect the environment if not adequately addressed.  

The amounts and types of wastes generated depend upon a variety of factors including: 

  • animal type, size and shape;
  • transportation and conveyance methods;
  • receiving and handling of animals;
  • processing times and  technologies;
  • amount of carcass washing;
  • wash temperatures;
  • cleaning/sanitation procedures; and
  • rendering operations. 

The information contained in this section includes environmental impacts for beef, pork, poultry and fish processing and associated rendering activities. The upstream processes of distribution and post-consumer packaging management are not covered. The manufacture of specialty meats and associated products are also not included in this topic hub. This sector focuses on activities that occur at a slaughterhouse and the related processes. The following table lists common wastes generated from specific processing areas. 

Meat & Seafood Processing Area Wastes

Process Area

Process Area Wastes 

Meat 

Transportation, receiving and holding   manure, hair, feathers, grit, mortalities
Slaughter blood, fluids
Cleaning feathers, skin, bone, hides, beaks
Bleeding blood
Trimming and evisceration trim scrap, offal, paunch material
Inspection contaminated and rejected materials
Further Processing meat scraps, cheeks, hides, feet, offal, bone and fat
Cooling and storage contaminated ice, damaged product, off-spec inventory
Prepared foods additives, oils, grease, sauces, damaged product
Fermented, smoked, pickled foods spices, brines, sauces, spoiled materials, drippings

Seafood

Catch by-catch
At-sea treatment cuttings, bones, blood, off-spec product
Transport and marketing off-spec, spoiled product
Receiving and thawing Spoiled materials, thaw-water, melted ice
Butchering and processing, including canning Off-cuts, viscera, bones, skins, suspended and dissolved solids, sauces, brines, fish oils other oils
Quarantine, storage and distribution Off-spec. materials, spoiled materials, damaged cans

Meat Processing Water Consumption: Like many other food processing activities, the necessity for hygiene and quality control in meat processing results in high water usage and consequently high wastewater generation. Volumes of wastewater from meat processing are generally 80-95 percent of the total freshwater consumption (MRC, 1995). The United Nations Environmental Program, Cleaner Production Assessment in Meat Processing (2000), estimates a range of 1,100 to 4,400 gallons of water are used per live weight ton of slaughtered animal in the United States. Between 44-60 percent of water is consumed in the slaughter, evisceration and boning areas (MRC, 1995). The following table illustrates the breakdown of water consumption in beef and pork processing based on a study of Australian abattoirs. 

Water Consumption in Meat (Beef and Pork) Processing Operations

Meat Processing Activity

Percent of Usage

Stockyard washdowns and animal watering 7-22 percent
Slaughter, evisceration and boning 44-66 percent
Casings production 9-20 percent
Rendering 8-38 percent
Domestic uses 2-5 percent
Chillers 2 percent
Boiler losses 1-4 percent

Meat Research Corporation (MRC), 1995

In poultry processing plants, in addition to being used for carcass washing and cleaning, water is also consumed for hot water scalding of birds prior to defeathering; in water flumes for transporting feathers, heads, feet and viscera; and for chilling birds. As a result, poultry processing tends to be more water intensive on a per unit  production basis than red meat processing (Wardrop Engineering, 1998). Water consumption rates vary from 4,000 to 24,000 gallons per 1,000 birds processed (Hrudey, 1984). 

Meat Processing Wastewater Generation: Freshwater consumption has a major impact on the volume and pollutant load of the resulting wastewater. Wastewaters generally have high organic loads and are also high in oils and grease, salt, nitrogen and phosphorous. At red meat abattoirs, water is used primarily for washing carcasses during the various process stages and for cleaning at the end of each shift. Eighty to 95 percent of water used in abattoirs is discharged as effluent (MRC, 1985). 

The wastewater from a slaughterhouse typically contains blood, manure, hair, fat, feathers and bones and may be at high temperatures. Untreated effluent may be as high as 8,000 mg/L BOD with suspended solids at 800 mg/L or greater. The wastewater may also have pathogens, including Salmonella and Shigella bacteria, parasite eggs and amoebic cysts. Pesticide residues may be present from treatment of animals or their feed. Chloride levels may be very high (up to 77,000 mg/L) from curing and pickling processes. Cooking activities also greatly increase the fat and grease concentration in the effluent. 

Fish Processing Water Consumption: Most seafood processors have a high baseline water use for cleaning plant and equipment. Therefore, water use per unit product decreases rapidly as production volume increases. Major sources of wastewater include: fish storage and transport; cleaning, freezing and thawing; preparation of brines; equipment sprays; offal transport; cooling water;  steam generation; and equipment and floor cleaning. 

Water consumption in fish processing operations has traditionally been high to achieve effective sanitation. Industry literature indicates that water use varies widely throughout the sector, from one to four gallons per pound of product. Several factors affect water use, including: the type of product processed, the scale of the operation, the process used, and the level of water minimization in place (Environment Canada, 1994a). General cleaning contributes significantly to total water demand so smaller-scale sites tend to have significantly higher water use per unit of production. Reducing wastewater volumes tends to have a significant impact on reducing organic loads, as these strategies are typically associated with reduced product contact and better segregation of high-strength streams.

Fish Processing Wastewater Generation: Wastewater from seafood processing operations can be very high in BOD, oil and grease, and nitrogen content. Literature data for seafood processing operations shows a BOD production of two to145 pounds of BOD per ton of product (Environment Canada, 1994a). White fish filleting processes typically produce 25 to 75 pounds BOD for every ton of product (UNEP, 1998). BOD comes primarily from the butchering process and from general cleaning and nitrogen originates -- predominantly from blood in the wastewater stream (Environment Canada, 1994a). Thawing operations can also account for up to 50 percent of the wastewater generated. 

Rendering Wastewater Generation: Rendering, while it recovers raw materials for beneficial use, raises the production of high-strength wastewater. Similarly, other byproduct recovery such as offal collection and hide treatment increase wastewater generation. Conveyance by fluming, carcass cleaning and general cleaning and sanitation also create significant quantities of wastewater.

Organic loads can vary considerably depending on whether the site incorporates a rendering operation. Rendering plants, where installed, are the largest single source of wastewater contamination. The wastewater from rendering (often referred to as stickwater) contains approximately 60 percent of the plant�s total COD output while being typically only 10 percent of the volume (MRC, 1995). As a general rule, red meat abattoirs with rendering will generate approximately 100 pounds COD/ton HSCW (hot standard carcass weight)*, whereas operations without rendering will generate only about 30 pounds COD/ton HSCW (MRC, 1998). 

Energy Consumption
Energy consumption depends upon the age and scale of the plant, level of automation, and range of products manufactured. Processes involving heating, such as cooking and canning, are very energy-intensive, whereas filleting requires less energy. Thermal energy, in the form of steam and hot water, is used for cleaning, heating water, sterilizing and for rendering.  Electricity is used for the operation of machinery and for refrigeration, ventilation, lighting and the production of compressed air. 

Like water consumption, the use of energy for refrigeration and sterilization is important for ensuring good quality meat and fish products.  Storage temperatures are often specified by regulation.  As well as depleting fossil fuel resources, the consumption of energy causes air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, which have been linked to global warming. Typical ranges for energy use are 330 to 1330 kW per ton of hot standard carcass weight. Representative figures for ton of fish processed range from 65 to 87 kW for filleting, 150-190 kW for canning, and about 32 kW for fish meal and oil production. The following table provides a breakdown of electricity consumption at a meat processing facility.

Meat (Beef & Pork) Processing Energy Consumption

Meat Processing Activity

Percentage of Usage

Refrigeration 59%
Boiler Room 10%
Rendering 9%
Slaughter 6%
Compressed Air 5%
Boning Room 3%
Others 8%

Energy Authority of New South Wales, 1985

Environmental Management in Hotel Industry

Environmental Management in Hotel Industry

The Central Pollution Control Board has taken -up the project on development of COINDS for Hotel Industry and the findings of the study done in various hotels are as follow:

Hotels have been classified as the industry and as such there is no regulations that govern the hotel industry. The number of Government approved hotels( classified hotels : 1* to 5* deluxe) in India is about 1164 commanding 64573 rooms.

For the purpose of development of guidelines for waste management practices in the hotel industries, all hotels, beach resorts, hill and tourist resort lodges, heritage properties, dhramshalas, guest houses and other kinds of the tourist resorts that provides accomodation to business travellers, pilgrims or tourists have been considered.

Large hotels in some states are regulated by the State Pollution Control Boards/Committees for implementation of Rules laid down under the Water Act. However, there are no specific standards or regulation formulated for this category of the industry.

The hotels use considerable quantity of the water drawing mainly from the deep tube wells or from municipality, in following sections mainly.
  • Guests room ( toilets and bathrooms)
  • Service areas ( toilets and bathrooms)
  • Drinking
  • Floor washing
  • Kitchen
  • Butchery
  • Laundry
  • Swimming pool
  • Plant utilities (AC plant, Boiler, Cooling tower)
  • Fire hydrants
  • Gardening


The details of water consumption in different sections in hotels and waste generation are as under:

S.No.
DESCRIPTION OF PROCESS
CONSUMPTION(KL/ day) from municipality & deep tube wells)
DISCHARGE (KL /day into municipality sewers and drains)
1.
Drinking Water
20
Nil
2.
Toilets (Guest rooms, public and service area)
300
280
3.
Kitchen
175
150
4.
Laundry
85
80
5.
Air conditioners
20
Nil
6.
Garden
20
Nil
7.
Swimming pool
20
15
8.
Fire Fighting
3
Nil
9.
Boiler
12
3
TOTAL
655
528



Average figures of water consumption and solid waste generation per room basis in large scale hotels are as follows:

S.No.
Details
Figures
1.
Raw Water Consumption KL /day/room 0.5-1.3
2.
Waste Water discharge KL/day/room 0.4-1.1
3.
Solid waste generated Kg/day/room 0.6-1.1
4.
Percentage of water discharged 80-93



Characteristics of the Wastewater generated in large as well as in medium and small scale hotels:

Sl. No.
Parameters
Large Hotels
Medium and Small Hotels
1
pH
7.2
8.1
2
TSS, mg/l
206
224
3
BOD, mg/l
265
108
4
COD, mg/l
350
224
5
Oil & Grease , mg/l
32
21
6
Phosphate, mg/l
0.1
--
7
Residual Chlorine, mg/l
0.2
--


The following observations have been made for improved environment management in Hotels

Wastewater Management

  • Wastewater reduction efforts in kitchen, laundry, toilets and wash room.
  • Wastewater treatment for kitchen, laundry & toilets and ecologically compatible discharge.
  • Recycling treated wastewater for gardening purpose.
  • Avoiding use of harmful chemicals for pest control and water treatment
  • Rain water harvesting and restricted use of ground water for consumptive purpose.

Air Pollution

  • Use of low sulphur fuel oil for combusting purpose in DG Sets and Boilers.
  • Use tall stacks (above the nearest building height) and use control devices wherever required.
  • Switch to gas fired equipment, wherever possible.
  • Optimise combustion efficiency at all firing ranges, maintain between 82% to 92%.
  • Maintain burners in efficient condition and ensure smoke free exhaust.
  • Maintain negative air pressure inside kitchen and laundry through appropriate measures.
  • Kitchen, laundry and toilet exhausts can be filtered before discharge. Activated carbon filters can also remove odours from such exhaust.

Solid Waste Management

  • Scrutinise avenues of solid waste reduction, department by department.
  • Avoid excessive packaging and use of foam pellets.
  • Avoid using polystyrene.
  • Use cloth bags in preference to paper towels.
  • Avoid using plastic wrapping bags and plastic straws.
  • Use cloth or canvas bags for laundry.
Saleem Asraf Syed Imdaadullah
Mobile:9899300371
Envo Projects
311/22,Zakir Nagar,
New Delhi-110025 ,India
Email:saleemasraf@gmail.com
blog:www.saleemindia.blogspot.com
Web Site : www.envo.8m.com
 
 

Saturday, February 23, 2008

MEAT INDUSTRY RENDERING PLANT SUPPLIER INDIA

RAIBA INDUSTRIES

Activities : Meat Machinery, Consultants Engineers For Food Processing, Packaging & Freezing, Meat, Fish, Poultry & Vegetable Processing Packaging Machinery, Material Handling Equipments, Slaughter Line For Cattles & Sheeps, Sealing Machinery & Spares

Contact : MR.Y.E.RAIBA - FOUNDER CHAIRMAN

Address : House No.5, Vetalpada, Maulana Azad Ngr., Nagaon II, Bhiwandi - 421302, Dist.Thane

Tel.No : (022 ) 26395294 / 02522 - 254524

Fax No : (022 ) 26395294

Tel: +91 22 26360009 Fax: +91 22 26395294 / +91 98690 36966 / +91 98690 36967

Works : House No.5, Vetal Pada, Maulana Azad Nagar, Nagaon II nd, Bhiwandi - 421302,
Maharashtra India Tel : +91 02522 254524
E mail :
response@raibaindustries.com / raiba_industries@rediffmail.com

Our Products : AUTOMATIC SLAUGHTER LINE

BELT CONVEYORS

BOWL CHOPPERS

BRISKET SAWS

BUCKET CONVEYORS

CARCASS SPLITTING SAWS

CONVEYORS

ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS

FILLING & SEALING MACHINES

FILLING MACHINERY & SPARES

FISH PROCESSING MACHINERY

HANGING RAILS

HEAD SPLITTERS

HIDE PULLER SLAUGHTER HOUSE HAND TOOLS

HOOVES CUTTERS

HORN CUTTERS

INDUSTRIAL MINCERS

INSULATED SLIDING DOORS

MARINE PRODUCT PROCESSING PACKAGING PLANTS

MATERIAL HANDLING EQUIPMENTS

MEAT PROCESSING MACHINERY & EQUIPMENTS

MEAT PROCESSING PLANT

MEAT PRODUCT PROCESSING PACKAGING PLANTS

METALLIC APRONS

MUTTON CUBE MAKING MACHINERY

OVER HEAD CONVEYORS

PACKAGING MACHINERY

POLY BAG FILTERS

PROCESSING CONVEYOR TABLES

RENDERING PLANTS

SCREW CONVEYORS

SEALING MACHINERY & SPARES

SEMI AUTOMATIC SLAUGHTER LINE

SHRINK WRAP MACHINES

SLAUGHTER HOUSE HAND TOOLS

SLAUGHTER HOUSE MACHINERY

STAINLESS STEEL FAT TRAPS

STUNNERS

VACUUM PACK MACHINES

FANS BRO ERECTORS Activities : Food Processing Equipments, Chemical Plant Machinery, Dairy Equipments, Fabrication & Erection Of Entire Dairy Plants, Storage Tanks, Pressure Vessels, Reaction Vessels, Agitators, Ribbon Blenders, Ventilation Systems, Roaster Cum Mixer, Pulper Cum Finisher, Milk Tankers Contact : MR.NARENDRA PHANSALKAR / MR.UDAY PHANSALKAR Address : A-202, Satyam Evershine Enclave, Mira Rd. (E) - 401107, Dist.Thane Tel.No : (022 ) 28457368 / 20584193 / 28108893 Fax No : (022 ) 28454622 :

AGITATORS

BOTTLE WASHING MACHINES

CHEMICAL PLANT MACHINERY

CHEMICAL PLANTS

CHEMICAL PROCESS PLANT & MACHINERY

FABRICATION

FABRICATION GENERAL

FILLING & SEALING MACHINES

FILLING MACHINERY & SPARES

FOOD PROCESSING MACHINERY EQUIPMENT

FOOD PROCESSING PLANTS

GENERAL FABRICATION

HEAT EXCHANGERS

HEAT EXCHANGERS (PROCESS PLANT)

JUICERS

KNEADING MACHINERY

MEAT PROCESSING PLANT

MIXING MACHINERY (PROCESS PLANT)

OFFSHORE PIPELINES

PHARMACEUTICAL MACHINERY

PIPE LINE FABRICATION & ERECTION

PIPING CONTRACTS OF ATOMIC POWER PROJECT

PLANETARY MIXERS

POLLUTION CONTROL SYSTEMS

PRESSURE VESSELS

Saleem Asraf Syed Imdaadullah
Mobile:9899300371
Envo Projects
311/22,Zakir Nagar,
New Delhi-110025 ,India
Email:saleemasraf@gmail.com
blog:www.saleemindia.blogspot.com
Web Site : www.envo.8m.com